Thursday and Friday

Three Cornered Moon (1933)

First played at the Stanford Theatre on September 29-30, 1933.

When a wealthy family loses everything, they have to find a way to survive during the Great Depression. Some are better at their new jobs than others.

“Predates golden age of screwball comedies, but tops many of them.” Leonard Maltin.

With Claudette Colbert, Richard Arlen, Mary Boland, Lyda Roberti, Wallace Ford, Tom Brown, William Bakewell, Hardie Albright, Joan Marsh, Sam Hardy, Clara Blandick.

Directed by Elliot Nugent. Written by S.K. Lauren, Ray Harris. Photographed by Leon Shamroy. Paramount. 77 minutes.

Plays Thursday and Friday (February 22-23) at 7:30.

Young Man of Manhattan (1930)

First played at the Stanford Theatre on June 3-6, 1930.

A sportswriter (Norman Foster) and a newspaperwoman (Claudette Colbert) marry after meeting at the fights. He is frustrated as she becomes more successful, then a dizzy dame (Ginger Rogers—“Cigarette me, big boy”) catches his eye.

With Claudette Colbert, Norman Foster, Ginger Rogers, Charles Ruggles, Leslie Austin, H. Dudley Hawley, Four Aalbu Sisters.

Directed by Monta Bell. Adaptation by Robert Presnell. Photographed by Larry Williams. Music by Pierre Norman, Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal. Paramount. 79 minutes.

Plays Thursday and Friday (February 22-23) at 6:00 and 9:00.

 

Saturday and Sunday

Shanghai Express (1932)

First played at the Stanford Theatre on March 27-29, 1932.

Shanghai Lily (Marlene Dietrich) is traveling on a train through China (in the midst of a civil war) when armed rebels threaten the lives of her fellow passengers.

Josef von Sternberg created a unique cinematic style, with a sensuous and almost decadent infatuation with visual imagination and the interplay of light and shadow on the screen.

With Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong, Warner Oland, Eugene Pallette, Louise Closser Hale.

Directed by Josef von Sternberg. Produced by Adolph Zukor. Screenplay by Jules Furthman. Photographed by Lee Garmes. Paramount. 82 minutes.

Plays Saturday and Sunday (February 24-25) at 4:20 and 7:30.

Daughter of the Dragon (1931)

First played at the Stanford Theatre on September 12, 1931.

In London, a dancer discovers her father is the notorious Dr. Fu Manchu. She promises to carry out his plan of vengeance, unaware that a detective is on to her. Anna May Wong plays the dancer, and Sessue Hayakawa plays the detective who falls for her.

This is a rare opportunity to see Asian lead actors in a major studio film from this period. Both Wong and Hayakawa were stars in the silent era, and Wong continued to work in some important films for Paramount, but it was difficult to find roles that were not stereotypes, and Daughter of the Dragon is no exception.

With Anna May Wong, Warner Oland, Sessue Hayakawa, Bramwell Fletcher, Frances Dade, Holmes Herbert, Lawrence Grant.

Directed by Lloyd Corrigan. Adaptation by Lloyd Corrigan, Monte M. Katterjohn. Photographed by Victor Milner. Paramount. 70 minutes.

Plays Saturday and Sunday (February 24-25) at 6:00 and 9:10.

 

Tuesday and Wednesday

I Take This Woman (1931)

First played at the Stanford Theatre on July 22-24, 1931.

A sophisticate marries a cowboy, and they suffer from culture clash.

With Gary Cooper, Carole Lombard, Helen Ware, Lester Vail, Charles Trowbridge, Clara Blandick.

Directed by Marion Gering. Written by Vincent Lawrence. Photographed by Victor Milner. Paramount. 72 minutes.

Plays Tuesday and Wednesday (February 27-28) at 7:30.

Ladies' Man (1931)

First played at the Stanford Theatre on May 10-12, 1931.

A gigolo is desired by a wealthy mother and her daughter, but then he falls in love with a third woman. He finds it’s not so easy to extricate himself from his complicated life.

With William Powell, Kay Francis, Carole Lombard, Gilbert Emery, Olive Tell, Martin Burton.

Directed by Lothar Mendes. Written by Herman J. Mankiewicz. Photographed by Victor Milner. Paramount. 73 minutes.

Plays Tuesday and Wednesday (February 27-28) at 6:05 and 8:55.